Saturday, October 23, 2010

Essay on Formative Assessment

Essay on Formative Assessment

Ah, yes, assessment. Well, between the two options, I think that formative assessment seems to be the most logical and attractive for the rookie teacher. A formative assessment is used during and throughout the course of study as an informal “diagnosis” or “monitor” of the instructional flow. Unlike summative assessment, there is little emphasis on scores or grades. It seems to me that formative assessment is mainly used to foster the teacher’s ability to strategize according to the differentiated needs of each classroom. It can assess learning in cognitive, affective and psychomotor domains. It also requires seven different steps: Identify the teaching objective, write a single assessable question, select an informal feedback strategy, decide how to introduce the strategy, apply the strategy, analyze and interpret the feedback, and respond to the results. An example of this would be executing the “Half-Minute Note Card” strategy: giving students a 1/2 minute to write the most important thing they learned in class. On the contrary, you could also ask them to write about what was the “muddiest” point of the lesson and discuss their responses in a group format.

Our Service Can Write a Custom Essay on Formative Assessment for You!


Summative assessment, on the other hand, is a much more formal strategy that requires more preparation, covers more content, must be valid, take longer for students to complete, and are considered high-stakes due to the grade attached to them. Summative assessments can either be commercially or teacher constructed. A prime example of a summative assessment is a portfolio (which would be graded by a more rigid rubric).

Ah, yes, assessment. Well, between the two options, I think that formative assessment seems to be the most logical and attractive for the rookie teacher. A formative assessment is used during and throughout the course of study as an informal “diagnosis” or “monitor” of the instructional flow. Unlike summative assessment, there is little emphasis on scores or grades. It seems to me that formative assessment is mainly used to foster the teacher’s ability to strategize according to the differentiated needs of each classroom. It can assess learning in cognitive, affective and psychomotor domains. It also requires seven different steps: Identify the teaching objective, write a single assessable question, select an informal feedback strategy, decide how to introduce the strategy, apply the strategy, analyze and interpret the feedback, and respond to the results. An example of this would be executing the “Half-Minute Note Card” strategy: giving students a 1/2 minute to write the most important thing they learned in class. On the contrary, you could also ask them to write about what was the “muddiest” point of the lesson and discuss their responses in a group format.

Summative assessment, on the other hand, is a much more formal strategy that requires more preparation, covers more content, must be valid, take longer for students to complete, and are considered high-stakes due to the grade attached to them. Summative assessments can either be commercially or teacher constructed. A prime example of a summative assessment is a portfolio (which would be graded by a more rigid rubric).

Ah, yes, assessment. Well, between the two options, I think that formative assessment seems to be the most logical and attractive for the rookie teacher. A formative assessment is used during and throughout the course of study as an informal “diagnosis” or “monitor” of the instructional flow. Unlike summative assessment, there is little emphasis on scores or grades. It seems to me that formative assessment is mainly used to foster the teacher’s ability to strategize according to the differentiated needs of each classroom. It can assess learning in cognitive, affective and psychomotor domains. It also requires seven different steps: Identify the teaching objective, write a single assessable question, select an informal feedback strategy, decide how to introduce the strategy, apply the strategy, analyze and interpret the feedback, and respond to the results. An example of this would be executing the “Half-Minute Note Card” strategy: giving students a 1/2 minute to write the most important thing they learned in class. On the contrary, you could also ask them to write about what was the “muddiest” point of the lesson and discuss their responses in a group format.

Summative assessment, on the other hand, is a much more formal strategy that requires more preparation, covers more content, must be valid, take longer for students to complete, and are considered high-stakes due to the grade attached to them. Summative assessments can either be commercially or teacher constructed. A prime example of a summative assessment is a portfolio (which would be graded by a more rigid rubric).

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Get Custom Essay on Formative Assessment
ATTENTION!!! HotEssays.blogspot.com provides free sample essays and essay examples on any topics and subjects. EssayLib.com essay writing service produces 100% custom essays, term papers & research papers, written by quality essay writers only. The prices start from $10 per page. You can order a custom essay on Formative Assessment now!

No comments:

Post a Comment

Note: Only a member of this blog may post a comment.